Planning & Pacing Guides

The primary purpose of these comprehensive guides is to model approaches for planning and pacing curriculum throughout the school year. They can also help with syllabus development when used in conjunction with the other Teach Cyber resources.

Each guide provides an example of how to design instruction using the Cybersecurity Curriculum Guidelines and based on the author’s teaching context (e.g., demographics, schedule, school type, setting). These course planning and pacing guides highlight how the components of the Cybersecurity Curriculum Guidelines – including the essential questions, learning objectives, and essential knowledge statements – are addressed in the course. Each guide also provides valuable suggestions for teaching the course, including the selection of resources, instructional activities, and classroom assessments.

While we encourage consuming a Planning & Pacing Guide (PPG) in its entirety, each PPG is broken up into units, and each unit can be downloaded individually.

Looking for a roadmap to help guide your curriculum? Read summaries of our PPG’s below!

Hairston_Williams PPG

Developed By: Jesse Hairston, Tania Williams

This yearlong introductory course is designed to provide fundamental knowledge in the field of cybersecurity. No prerequisites are required. The course begins with defining cybersecurity and its importance at the individual, corporate, government, and international levels. Next, the course discusses the CIA triad and gives a basic introduction to computer hardware, which are knowledge units needed for the rest of the course. After providing this foundational introduction to the field, the course explores how cybersecurity is integrated into the fabric of human life by examining its impact on nations, laws, economics, and personal data. The course then becomes more technical in nature, introducing students to the principles of software design, physical security controls, cryptography, authentication and identity management, software vulnerabilities, the OSI model, network standards and protocols, the Internet, and hardware and software integration. The course ends by teaching security testing and assessment, securing cyber physical systems, and design trade-offs. Ethics, thinking like an adversary, careers, and historic components are interwoven throughout the course.

Bastian PPG

Developed By: Bobbie Bastian

This is a yearlong elective course open to 10th-12th graders who have taken either AP Computer Science A or AP Computer Science Principles, or who have received instructor approval. The course aims to give students a basic understanding of cybersecurity through technical reading, videos, podcasts, class discussions, hands-on applications, simulations, and board games. The course begins with an introduction to ethics, examining the ways in which values shape societies, ethical questions surrounding the use of technology, and the privacy/security trade-off. Next, the course discusses the CIA triad and gives a basic introduction to computer hardware, which are knowledge units needed for the rest of the course. The course then becomes more technical in nature, introducing students to image hardening, cryptography, network standards, and the OSI model. Next, students learn about the impacts of cybersecurity on personal, economic, political, and national security via lessons on disinformation campaigns, social engineering, supply chain security, and cyber warfare. The course concludes with identifying common security vulnerabilities (in hardware and software) and modeling cybersecurity risk.